Parmenides Foundation—Archive News

 
 

International Financial |Workshop

International workshop on "Systemic risk and regulatory market risk measures" on June 2 & 3, 2014
Learn more

 
 

Parmenides Lecture |Series

The next event in the Parmenides Lecture Series, organized in corporation with LMU, is on May 23, 2014, featuring a talk from Thomas Filk (apl. Prof. Dr., University of Freiburg)
Learn more

 
 

Project INSIGHT|Successful FET Open|Grant Application

Professor Eörs Szathmáry, Director of the Center for the Conceptual Foundations of Science, heads an international consortium in another successful FET Open grant application.
Learn more

 
 

Interview with|Prof. von Müller on|Constellatory|Diagnostics

Interviewed at the COST conference in Cyprus in July 2012 Professor Albrecht von Muller comments on the connection between philosophy and science and the personalized medicine.
> Watch the interview

 
 

Successful ERC|Advanced Grant|Application

Professor Eörs Szathmáry, Director of the Center for the Conceptual Foundations of Science, wins ERC Advanced Grant.

> Learn more

 
 

Parmenides publication in Biology Direct

Parmenides publication in Biology Direct is the most
highly accessed paper in the history of the journal
http://www.biology-direct.com/mostviewed

> Download the article as PDF-File

 
 

New Parmenides Center

Currently a new center for investigating the conceptual foundations of science is being established. The emerging Parmenides Center for the Conceptual Foundations of Science will broaden the field of activities of the foundation. It is headed by Eörs Szathmáry and will be built up during 2011 and 2012. >more

 
 

Article on thinking

by Ernst Pöppel, co-director of the Parmenides Center for the Study of Thinking

A Toolbox for Thinking >PDF

 
  
 

Parmenides Publication

announces the release of volume 3 of the Book Series “On Thinking” published with Springer:

Culture and Neural Frames of Cognition and Communication. Edited by  Shihui Han, Department of Psychology, Peking University and Ernst Pöppel, Human Science Center, Ludwig Maximilian University Munich

The third volume of Parmenides Book Series focuses on the relationship between culture and cognition because there has been accumulating evidence during the last few years that socio- cultural contexts generate strong influence on human cognition and the underlying neural substrates. Since then, there has been increasing interest in studies of the interaction between sociocultural factors and multiple levels (e.g., gene, neuron, neural circuit) of the biological basis of cognitive processes. Researchers have also started to examine neurocognitve processes in specific sociocultural contexts from the evolutionary point of view in order to understand the mutual interactions between environments and the human brain.

 The book is organized so that two chapters provide general views of the relation between biological evolution, cultural evolution and recent cultural neuroscience studies, while other chapters focus on various aspects of human cognition that have been shown to be strongly influenced by sociocultural factors such as self-concept representation, language processes, emotion, time perception, and decision-making. The main goal of this work is to address how thinking and the underlying neural mechanisms are affected by culture and identity.

Learn more about the Parmenides Book Series -> here

 
 

Parmenides at INTERACT

The Parmenides Foundation presents itself on 7 April 2011 at the one-day PhD symposium <interact> 2011. Parmenides is one of the donors to this event.

<interact> is organized exclusively by PhD students and aims for bringing together PhD students from all around Munich and giving them a platform that would promote interdisciplinary exchange. Students from the three Max Planck Institutes - the MPI of Biochemistry, MPI of Neurobiology and MPI of Psychiatry -- as well as the Helmholtz Zentrum München and the two renowned universities Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität (LMU) and Technische Universität München (TUM) meet on this one day symposium to communicate and exchange knowledge in the various fields of research which Munich is a home for. This one day event includes oral and poster presentations as well as impressive talks by guest speakers which promote lively discussions and a chance for students to interact and build new scientific contacts.

 
 

Publication: Book Series “On Thinking” published with Springer

The second volume of the Parmenides Book Series - „Towards a Theory of Thinking“ - has been released. The book features 23 chapters of internationally renowned scientists and pursues a multidisciplinary approach by presenting perspectives on thinking from philosophy, experimental and developmental psychology, neuro- and cognitive science, cognitive linguistics, evolutionary anthropology and biology.
-> More

 
 

Nature paper by John O'Doherty, Parmenides Faculty

Elizabeth Tricomi, Antonio Rangel, Colin F. Camerer, John P. O’Doherty:
Neural evidence for inequality-averse social preferences.
(Nature 463, 1089-1091 (25 February 2010))

John O’Doherty and his group used functional MRI to test for the existence of inequality-averse social preferences in the human brain. They created inequality between recruited pairs of subjects by giving one of them a large monetary endowment. They found that the reward centers, i.e. the ventral striatum and ventromedial prefrontal cortex respond more strongly when a ‘poor person’ receives a financial reward than when a ‘rich person’ does – this happens also in the heads of the rich. Thus even the basic reward structures in the human brain are not purely self-oriented. Although it’s long been known that humans dislike inequality, O’Doherty and his group found neural evidence of the brain’s response to it.

Prof. O’Doherty is professor of psychology at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and Thomas N.Mitchell Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience.

 
 

Publication

We are proud to present the latest publication by Eörs Szathmáry - member of the Parmenides Faculty and research core team:
Biological Foundations and Origin of Syntax (edited together with Derek Bickerton), MIT Press.

Unlike most previous work on the evolution of language, Biological Foundations and Origin of Syntax follows through on a growing consensus among researchers that language can be profitably separated into a number of related and interacting but largely autonomous functions, each of which may have a distinguishable evolutionary history and neurological base. 

The book describes the current state of research on syntax in different fields, with special emphasis on areas in which the findings of particular disciplines might shed light on problems faced by other disciplines.

(Strüngmann Forum Reports)

 

Nature paper by John O'Doherty, Parmenides Faculty (copy 2)

Elizabeth Tricomi, Antonio Rangel, Colin F. Camerer, John P. O’Doherty:
Neural evidence for inequality-averse social preferences.
(Nature 463, 1089-1091 (25 February 2010))

John O’Doherty and his group used functional MRI to test for the existence of inequality-averse social preferences in the human brain. They created inequality between recruited pairs of subjects by giving one of them a large monetary endowment. They found that the reward centers, i.e. the ventral striatum and ventromedial prefrontal cortex respond more strongly when a ‘poor person’ receives a financial reward than when a ‘rich person’ does – this happens also in the heads of the rich. Thus even the basic reward structures in the human brain are not purely self-oriented. Although it’s long been known that humans dislike inequality, O’Doherty and his group found neural evidence of the brain’s response to it.

Prof. O’Doherty is professor of psychology at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and Thomas N.Mitchell Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience.

 

Nature paper by John O'Doherty, Parmenides Faculty (copy 1)

Elizabeth Tricomi, Antonio Rangel, Colin F. Camerer, John P. O’Doherty:
Neural evidence for inequality-averse social preferences.
(Nature 463, 1089-1091 (25 February 2010))

John O’Doherty and his group used functional MRI to test for the existence of inequality-averse social preferences in the human brain. They created inequality between recruited pairs of subjects by giving one of them a large monetary endowment. They found that the reward centers, i.e. the ventral striatum and ventromedial prefrontal cortex respond more strongly when a ‘poor person’ receives a financial reward than when a ‘rich person’ does – this happens also in the heads of the rich. Thus even the basic reward structures in the human brain are not purely self-oriented. Although it’s long been known that humans dislike inequality, O’Doherty and his group found neural evidence of the brain’s response to it.

Prof. O’Doherty is professor of psychology at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), and Thomas N.Mitchell Professor of Cognitive Neuroscience at the Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience.

 

Events / Parmenides Talk

Prof. Andreas Herz will be giving a talk about current work at the Bernstein Center for Compuational Neuroscience
Date: October 14, 2009  at 3 pm
Venue: Parmenides Foundation, Kardinal Faulhaber Str. 14 a

 

November 18, 2009, 15:00

Ich, Neuronen, Freiheit: Widersprechen die Ergebnisse der Hirnforschung der Willensfreiheit?
Talk by Prof. Ansgar Beckermann, University Bielefeld

 

Education - New University Seminars and Courses

The winter term at the Ludwig Maximilian University has just started. Please see Parmenides seminars and courses -> here

 

Check out the revised Parmenides homepage!

Striving for a clear, clean, intuitive interface we made improvements to the structure of the site and the navigation. Apart from the updated look you thus get easier and faster access to project descriptions, workshop documentations and better understanding of the organisation of the foundation and the people behind it.

For the site we now use Typo3 to manage pages and content. It allows us to make the website an ongoing project that is updated frequently and reflects the growth and activities, products and services of the Parmenides Foundation.

 

The ability to communicate or control an object by the power of sheer thought.

Prof. Birbaumer is head of the Institute of Medical Psychology and Behavioral Neurobiology as well as the Magnetoencephalography (MEG) Center. Among his broadly diversified research interests is neural plasticity and learning, epilepsy, Parkinson disease and pain illnesses. His main interest during the last 15 years has been Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCI), which consists of exchanging information between brain and machines without using the limbs. This research could, for example, allow patients in final stage of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) to communicate with their environment.